Garden Wildlife
             Garden Wildlife
Introduction to plants and fungi
 
OK, we know that fungi are not plants but a Kingdom in their own right, and are actually more closely related to animals than plants, within the Opisthokonta.  However, for most people, the non-mobile, plant-like nature of fungi means they are thought of in the same way as plants, even if they are not green and can't photosynthesise.   Lichens are a special case of a deep symbiosis between plants and fungi.
 
It is rather strange that nearly all books and websites about garden wildlife concentrate almost exclusively on the animals that live in gardens - and mostly on the ones we like such as birds, bees and butterflies. Plants are generally relegated to the role of nectar sources or food for caterpillars.
 
The Wildlife Gardening Forum considers that wildlife gardens should be seen as a resource for plant biodiversity as well as for vertebrates and invertebrates. There are a few constraints, such as the fact that while insects and birds can freely migrate in or out of your garden, most plants are less mobile and need actively to be established. This means that a carefully maintained wildflower area could be lost to the next occupant of the house when you move on. Gardens may not be ideal reservoirs for conserving wild plants, but that is no reason not to encourage them, and by so doing, help more people understand and respect our wildflowers.
 
Of all the special interests recorded by people signing on as members of the Forum, wildflowers was by far the most commonly recorded.  We will be creating our plants pages based on suggestions from our members as to what information they would most value.
 
Pages on flowering plants, lichens and fungi are currently being written, and will appear as they are finished. We expect they will include:
 
  • Wild flowers- several pages on wild (non horticultural) plants including grasses and aquatics
  • Ferns
  • Mosses and liverworts
  • Algae- in water and on trees
  • Fungi
  • Lichens
 
Holding page written by Steve Head
Introduction to plants and fungi
 
OK, we know that fungi are not plants but a Kingdom in their own right, and are actually more closely related to animals than plants, within the Opisthokonta.  However, for most people, the non-mobile, plant-like nature of fungi means they are thought of in the same way as plants, even if they are not green and can't photosynthesise.   Lichens are a special case of a deep symbiosis between plants and fungi.
 
 
 
 
 
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It is rather strange that nearly all books and websites about garden wildlife concentrate almost exclusively on the animals that live in gardens - and mostly on the ones we like such as birds, bees and butterflies. Plants are generally relegated to the role of nectar sources or food for caterpillars.
 
The Wildlife Gardening Forum considers that wildlife gardens should be seen as a resource for plant biodiversity as well as for vertebrates and invertebrates. There are a few constraints, such as the fact that while insects and birds can freely migrate in or out of your garden, most plants are less mobile and need actively to be established. This means that a carefully maintained wildflower area could be lost to the next occupant of the house when you move on. Gardens may not be ideal reservoirs for conserving wild plants, but that is no reason not to encourage them, and by so doing, help more people understand and respect our wildflowers.
 
Of all the special interests recorded by people signing on as members of the Forum, wildflowers was by far the most commonly recorded.  We will be creating our plants pages based on suggestions from our members as to what information they would most value.
 
Pages on flowering plants, lichens and fungi are currently being written, and will appear as they are finished. We expect they will include:
 
  • Wild flowers- several pages on wild (non horticultural) plants including grasses and aquatics
  • Ferns
  • Mosses and liverworts
  • Algae- in water and on trees
  • Fungi
  • Lichens
 
Holding page written by Steve Head
       Garden Wildlife
             Garden Wildlife