Introduction to garden wildlife
 
This section will grow to be by far the largest part of our website.  It aims to give an introduction and guide - not to all the species found in gardens - but to all the major groups of species.  Some popular garden-living groups, such as butterflies, birds and bees, are well covered on the web, and we will not give much space to these, but instead provide links and guides to these already excellent sources.  There is a lot of information on garden wildlife in general on the RHS/Wildlife Trust website Wild about Gardens.  You can also find a list of useful books and leaflets on garden wildlife through our Finding out More page.
 
We will be concentrating here on the smaller and less charismatic fauna and flora of gardens, especially the insects, of which Dr Jennifer Owen found nearly 2,000 species in her modest Leicester garden. Her work allows us to estimate that more than 8,000 insect species may be encountered in gardens if you look hard enough and have access to professional help in identifying species.
 
As we develop this phase of our website, we have a lot of material nearly ready to publish, and in the next months this section will start to build rapidly.  We will need to devise simple guides to the complexity of the different insect groups, and find suitable pictures to illustrate the adult insects and their life cycles.
 
This is where you can help!
 
We have listed below the list of pages on garden wildlife we plan to include.  Thanks to hard work by Andrew Halstead, we have draft texts for pretty much all the invertebrate pages, and with help from our partner organisations, many texts for other groups too.  These are shown in green. Pages already on the site are shown as links.
 
If you have good photographs, especially of the more obscure insect and invertebrate groups, and their younger stages, ideally with the correct name of the creature concerned, we would be delighted to receive and use them (with due acknowledgement of authorship) on this site.   Please contact us using the Website comments, photos or offers of help form if you may be able to help with photos or drawings, or especially  video clips and sound recordings!
 
Pages we plan to include:
 
Insects and other invertebrates                                                      Other groups
 
 
Introduction to garden wildlife
 
This section will grow to be by far the largest part of our website.  It aims to give an introduction and guide - not to all the species found in gardens - but to all the major groups of species.  Some popular garden-living groups, such as butterflies, birds and bees, are well covered on the web, and we will not give much space to these, but instead provide links and guides to these already excellent sources.  There is a lot of information on garden wildlife in general on the RHS/Wildlife Trust website Wild about Gardens.  You can also find a list of useful books and leaflets on garden wildlife through our Finding out More page.
 
We will be concentrating here on the smaller and less charismatic fauna and flora of gardens, especially the insects, of which  Dr Jennifer Owen  found nearly 2,000 species in her modest Leicester garden. Her work allows us to estimate that more than 8,000 insect species may be encountered in gardens if you look hard enough and have access to professional help in identifying species.
 
As we launch this second phase of our website, we have a lot of material nearly ready to publish, and in the next months this section will start to build rapidly.  We will need to devise simple guides to the complexity of the different insect groups, and find suitable pictures to illustrate the adult insects and their life cycles.
 
This is where you can help!
 
We have listed below the list of pages on garden wildlife we plan to include.  Thanks to hard work by Andrew Halstead, we have draft texts for pretty much all the invertebrate pages, and with help from our partner organisations, many texts for other groups too.  These are shown in green. Pages already on the site are shown as links.
 
If you have good photographs, especially of the more obscure insect and invertebrate groups, and their younger stages, ideally with the correct name of the creature concerned, we would be delighted to receive and use them (with due acknowledgement of authorship) on this site.   Please contact us using the Website comments, photos or offers of help form if you may be able to help with photos or drawings, or especially video clips and sound recordings!
 
Pages we plan to include:
 
Insects and other invertebrates                                                               
 
 
Moths leaf-mining
Moths root-eating
Moths fruit-eating 
Moths stem boring 
Butterflies
Hymenoptera intro page
Sawflies and woodwasps
Solitary wasps
Solitary Bees
Social Wasps
Parasitic wasps
Honeybee
Gall wasps
Bumblebees
Ants
Diptera introduction
Bee flies
Bibionid flies
Biting flies
Compost bin flies
Gall-forming flies
Hoverflies
Leaf-mining flies
Parasitic flies
Root-eating flies
Spiders and relatives
Spiders
Harvestmen
Mites Introduction
Gall mites
Sap-sucking mites
Other spider relatives
Snails and slugs
Pond snails
Worms Introduction
Earthworms
Nematodes
Leeches
Flatworms
Woodlice
Pond crustacea
Birds
Mammals Intro
Insectivores
Carnivores
Larger herbivores
Rodents
Bats
Amphibia
Reptiles
 
 
Wild flowers
Ferns
Mosses and liverworts
Algae
Fungi
Lichens
Life in soil
Microscopic life
 
Arthropods Introduction
Insects Introduction
Alder flies 
Barkflies barklice booklice  
Cockroaches  
Crickets 
Dragonflies & damselflies 
Earwigs 
Fleas 
Grass/ ground hoppers 
Hemiptera introduction 
Shieldbugs 
Plant-feeding land bugs 
Pond bugs 
Predatory land bugs 
Leafhoppers 
Froghoppers 
Planthoppers
Adelgids 
Aphids 
Psyllids suckers 
Scale insects 
Whiteflies 
Mealybugs 
Lacewings 
Mayflies 
Scorpion flies & snow flea 
Stoneflies 
Thrips  
Coleoptera intro page 
Dead wood beetles 
Carrion beetles
Dung beetles 
Leaf-eating beetles 
Pollen beetles 
Pond beetles 
Predatory land beetles 
Root eating beetles
Other beetles
Lepidoptera Introduction
Moths Introduction
Moths day-flying
Moths solitary larvae
Moths gregarious larvae
 
       Garden Wildlife
             Garden Wildlife
Other groups
 
Birds
Mammals Intro
Insectivores
Carnivores
Larger herbivores
Rodents
Bats
Amphibia
Reptiles
 
 
Wild flowers
Ferns
Mosses and liverworts
Algae
Fungi
Lichens
Life in soil
Microscopic life
 
Moths leaf-mining
Moths root-eating
Moths fruit-eating 
Moths stem boring 
Butterflies
Hymenoptera intro page
Sawflies and woodwasps
Solitary wasps
Solitary Bees
Social Wasps
Parasitic wasps
Honeybee
Gall wasps
Bumblebees
Ants
Diptera introduction
Bee flies
Bibionid flies
Biting flies
Compost bin flies
Gall-forming flies
Hoverflies
Leaf-mining flies
Parasitic flies
Root-eating flies
Spiders and relatives
Spiders
Harvestmen
Mites Introduction
Gall mites
Sap-sucking mites
Other spider relatives
Snails and slugs
Pond snails
Worms Introduction
Earthworms
Nematodes
Leeches
Flatworms
Woodlice
Pond crustacea
Arthropods Introduction
Insects Introduction
Alder flies 
Barkflies barklice booklice  
Cockroaches  
Crickets 
Dragonflies & damselflies 
Earwigs 
Fleas 
Grass/ ground hoppers 
Hemiptera introduction 
Shieldbugs 
Plant-feeding land bugs 
Pond bugs 
Predatory land bugs 
Leafhoppers 
Froghoppers 
Planthoppers
Adelgids 
Aphids 
Psyllids suckers 
Scale insects 
Whiteflies 
Mealybugs 
Lacewings 
Mayflies 
Scorpion flies & snow flea 
Stoneflies 
Thrips  
Coleoptera intro page 
Dead wood beetles 
Carrion beetles
Dung beetles 
Leaf-eating beetles 
Pollen beetles 
Pond beetles 
Predatory land beetles 
Root eating beetles
Other beetles
Lepidoptera Introduction
Moths Introduction
Moths day-flying
Moths solitary larvae
Moths gregarious larvae