Selfheal  Prunella vulgaris   
 
Family – Lamiaceae, Deadnettle family 
Perennial – up to 15 cm tall, c. 40 cm spread
Flowering – June to August
Soils - Neutral
Sun – Full sun or partial shade
   
  
 
Selfheal has low-growing, leafy stems that root readily at the nodes making it somewhat invasive and so an ideal cover plant in a mixed lawn or shady bed. It is also tough, and can withstand some trampling. The vivid blueish purple tubular flowers make a great show in July and, being rich in nectar, are very popular with bumble bees.
 
Selfheal was first recorded by William Turner in 1548.1. The name Prunella is derived from "Brunella", which is itself taken from "die Bräune", the German name for quinsy (a type of throat inflammation), which it was historically used to cure. Like many in its family, this plant is rich in chemical compounds used in medicines in various parts of the world. Its other English names  healall, touch-and-heal, carpenter’s herb (good for cuts)2. emphasize its healing properties.  Culpeper3. emphasised its wound healing properties, and recommended it for bruises and headache.
 
The plant is edible - young leaves and stems are used in salads, soups, stews, and are boiled as a pot herb. The aerial parts can be dried and infused to make a herbal tea.
 
 
 
 
References
 
 
1. Pearman, D. (2017). The Discovery of the Native Flora of Britain and Ireland, A compilation of the first records for 1670 species and aggregates, covering Great Britain, Ireland, The Channel Isles and the Isle of Man. Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland.   p326
 
2. Vickery, R. (2019). Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A to Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. London. p620
 
3.  Culpeper’s Complete Herbal ed. Steven Foster (2019) Sterling New York p.218
 
4.  See the Biological Records Centre database  
 
Page written by Camilla Lambrick, compiled by Steve Head
 
Selfheal is a food plant for several beetles, bugs and moths, including the attractive green dead-nettle leaf beetle Chrysolina fastuosa (left), the bright-line brown-eye moth Lacanobia oleracea and the shaded pug moth  Eupithecia subumbrata.4.
Selfheal  Prunella vulgaris   
 
Family – Lamiaceae, Deadnettle family 
Perennial – up to 15 cm tall, c. 40 cm spread
Flowering – June to August
Soils - Neutral
Sun – Full sun or partial shade
   
  
 
Selfheal has low-growing, leafy stems that root readily at the nodes making it somewhat invasive and so an ideal cover plant in a mixed lawn or shady bed. It is also tough, and can withstand some trampling. The vivid blueish purple tubular flowers make a great show in July and, being rich in nectar, are very popular with bumble bees.
 
Selfheal was first recorded by William Turner in 1548.1. The name Prunella is derived from "Brunella", which is itself taken from "die Bräune", the German name for quinsy (a type of throat inflammation), which it was historically used to cure. Like many in its family, this plant is rich in chemical compounds used in medicines in various parts of the world. Its other English names  healall, touch-and-heal, carpenter’s herb (good for cuts)2. emphasize its healing properties.  Culpeper3. emphasised its wound healing properties, and recommended it for bruises and headache.
 
The plant is edible - young leaves and stems are used in salads, soups, stews, and are boiled as a pot herb. The aerial parts can be dried and infused to make a herbal tea.
 
 
 
 
Selfheal is a food plant for several beetles, bugs and moths, including the attractive green dead-nettle leaf beetle Chrysolina fastuosa (left), the bright-line brown-eye moth Lacanobia oleracea and the shaded pug moth  Eupithecia subumbrata. 4.
References
 
 
1. Pearman, D. (2017). The Discovery of the Native Flora of Britain and Ireland, A compilation of the first records for 1670 species and aggregates, covering Great Britain, Ireland, The Channel Isles and the Isle of Man. Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland.  p326
 
2. Vickery, R. (2019). Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A to Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. London. p620
 
3.  Culpeper’s Complete Herbal ed. Steven Foster (2019) Sterling New York p.218
 
4.  See the Biological records Centre database  
 
 
Page written by Camilla Lambrick, compiled by Steve Head
 
       Garden Wildplants
             Garden Wildplants