We currently send out newsletters four times in the year.  They contain news about the Forum, and especially about
new research findings, surveys and upcoming events. 

The newsletter is sent directly to our members as soon as it is finished, and we post the previous newsletter on
this page at that point.  Forum members therefore have priority access, and this is a good reason to join!

We are very keen for everyone to submit material for the newsletter, especially about events you may be running
locally or regionally that might attract our members.  Submit material using the Send us your news form on the
Contact Us page.


If you have interesting photos, videos or ideas to share, you can also use our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Newsletters from the Forum
Last newsletter released to the web
Recent newsletters
 
Recent newsletters
Last newsletter released to the web

Newsletters from the Forum

We currently send out newsletters four times in the year.  They contain news
about the Forum, and especially about new research findings, surveys and
upcoming events. 

The newsletter is sent directly to our members as soon as it is finished, and we
post the previous newsletter on this page at that point.  Forum members
therefore have priority access, and this is a good reason to join!

We are very keen for everyone to submit material for the newsletter, especially
about events you may be running locally or regionally that might attract our
members.  Submit material using the Send us your news form on the Contact Us
page. 

If you have interesting photos, videos or ideas to share, you can also use our
Facebook and Twitter pages.
Newsletter archive
 
Contents are indexed and available through the Search facility
NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE - back to 2009
 
Contents are indexed and available through the Search facility
May 2020 Newsletter
 
• Great news from the Natural History  
   Museum's wildlife garden
• Complex patterns in insect declines
• Pollinator flower strips work!
• The wren is our commonest garden bird
• New disease killing German blue tits
May 2020 Newsletter
 
Great news from the Natural History  
   Museum's wildlife garden
Complex patterns in insect declines
Pollinator flower strips work!
The wren is our commonest garden bird
New disease killing German blue tits
November 2020 Newsletter
 
• Massed calls for policy changes
• Butterflies need to chill out
• Microplastics in soil
• "Insect Armageddon" revisited
• Metaldehyde slug pellet ban
• Some birds sing for fun?
August 2020 
 
• Wildlife gardening in the age of Covid
• Pine martens and squirrels
• Urban insects limit bird breeding
• Flowers for bumblebees
• Moths as pollinators
• Urban foxes evolving
• Gardening and happiness
November 2020 Newsletter
 
• Massed calls for policy changes
• Butterflies need to chill out
• Microplastics in soil
"Insect Armageddon" revisited
• Metaldehyde slug pellet ban
• Some birds sing for fun?
August 2020 Newsletter
 
• Wildlife gardening in the age of Covid
• Pine martens and squirrels
• Urban insects limit bird breeding
• Flowers for bumblebees
• Moths as pollinators
• Urban foxes evolving
• Gardening and happiness
February 2021 Newsletter
 
• Massed calls for policy changes
• Butterflies need to chill out
• Microplastics in soil
• "Insect Armageddon" revisited
• Metaldehyde slug pellet ban
• Some birds sing for fun?
February 2021 Newsletter
 
• Massed calls for policy changes
• Butterflies need to chill out
• Microplastics in soil
"Insect Armageddon" revisited
• Metaldehyde slug pellet ban
• Some birds sing for fun?