Garden Wildplants
             Garden Wildplants
Lichens
 
Lichens are composite organisms, made up as a symbiotic union between a fungus partner and a photosynthetic organism, usually an alga. The resulting super-organisms live like plants, and come in a tremendous variety of shapes and colours.  While some are sensitive to - and indicators of pollution, many are extremely tough and can survive in the most difficult of habitats.
 
There are many species of lichen that can be found in gardens, depending on the air quality and climate of where you are.  Some live on stone and brick, others on living trees and shrubs. and others in shady damp places. 
 
Naturalist Joe Beale has contributed text and photographs for one or more pages on lichens on this website, and we will be putting these up on the website as soon as possible.
 
 
 
       Garden Wildplants
             Garden Wildplants
Lichen photos by Joe Beale    Evernia prunastri                                         Arthonia radiata
 
 
Books and websites
 
The British Lichen Society website 
 
Field Studies Council fold-out guides: Urban Lichens 1 lichens on wood  Urban Lichens 2 lichens on stone and soil Good for getting started, but bear in mind they only cover a selection of species.
 
Frank Dobson (2018) Lichens: an Illustrated Guide to the British and Irish Species (7th edition) by  Richmond Publishing, Slough. For those who are looking at lichens in more depth.
 
Field Studies Council fold-out chartKey to Lichens on Twigs by Pat Wolseley, Peter James & Diccon Alexander (2003). FSC
 
Field Studies CouncilA Field Key to Common Churchyard Lichens by Frank Dobson (2006). 2nd edition. 38pp.
 
Key to common lichens on trees in England Webpage here
 
Lichens of Wales website Useful resources to explore
 
 
Temporary page written and compiled by Steve Head
Lichens 
 
Lichens are composite organisms, made up as a symbiotic union between a fungus partner and a photosynthetic organism, usually an alga.  The resulting super-organisms live like plants, and come in a tremendous variety of shapes and colours.  While some are sensitive to - and indicators of pollution, many are extremely tough and can survive in the most difficult of habitats.
 
There are many species of lichen that can be found in gardens, depending on the air quality and climate of where you are.  Some live on stone and brick, others on living trees and shrubs. and others in shady damp places. 
 
Naturalist Joe Beale has contributed text and photographs for one or more pages on lichens on this website, and we will be putting these up on the website as soon as possible.
 
 
 
Lichen photos by Joe Beale    Evernia prunastri         Arthonia radiata
 
 
Books and websites
 
The British Lichen Society website 
 
Field Studies Council fold-out guides: Urban Lichens 1 lichens on wood  Urban Lichens 2 lichens on stone and soil Good for getting started, but bear in mind they only cover a selection of species.
 
Frank Dobson (2018) Lichens: an Illustrated Guide to the British and Irish Species (7th edition) by  Richmond Publishing, Slough. For those who are looking at lichens in more depth.
 
Field Studies Council fold-out chartKey to Lichens on Twigs by Pat Wolseley, Peter James & Diccon Alexander (2003). FSC
 
Field Studies CouncilA Field Key to Common Churchyard Lichens by Frank Dobson (2006). 2nd edition. 38pp.
 
Key to common lichens on trees in England Webpage here
 
Lichens of Wales website Useful resources to explore
 
 
Temporary page written and compiled by Steve Head