Dandelion                       Bindweeds           
 
 
 
 
Gatecrashers
 
 
Many wild flowers such as chickweed, dandelion, buttercup, ragwort and docks arrive in our gardens uninvited or were already growing in the garden before we arrived. To the extent that they are uninvited, we are calling them “gatecrashers” rather than the perjorative “weeds” because while unexpected guests can be a problem, they can often liven up a party and be actually quite attractive when you get to know them!
 
Don’t be too hasty with their removal, keep a few and examine them – they are more beautiful and interesting than they are credited . And watch to see which insects they attract. In addition to extra colour and variety in the garden, these species provide nectar and food for caterpillars of some attractive moths and butterflies.
 
Many of these plants were originally cultivated as culinary herbs or vegetables and may still be enjoyed today.  Remember in addition, that these species are native to Britain and Ireland and they certainly have a right to share our space with us!    
 
If you would like to read more about "Weeds" we can recommend the rather balanced "The book of weeds: How to deal with plants that behave badly" by Ken Thompson (2009) published by Dorling Kindersley, and for a more literary encomium of a small number of species: "Weeds" by Richard Mabey (2010) Profile books.  Also try Hatfield, A.W. 1970. How to enjoy your Weeds. Frederick Muller. London
 
 
 
 
Cick on the image or link to find out more about these plants.
         Chickweed                     Cleavers                         Nettles                          Fat hen                Garlic mustard          
         Herb Robert                      Ragworts                    Couch grass            Creeping buttercup        Rosebay willowherb  
Gatecrashers
 
Many wild flowers such as chickweed, dandelion, buttercup, ragwort and docks arrive in our gardens uninvited or were already growing in the garden before we arrived. To the extent that they are uninvited, we are calling them “gatecrashers” rather than the perjorative “weeds” because while unexpected guests can be a problem, they can often liven up a party and be actually quite attractive when you get to know them!
 
Don’t be too hasty with their removal, keep a few and examine them – they are more beautiful and interesting than they are credited . And watch to see which insects they attract. In addition to extra colour and variety in the garden, these species provide nectar and food for caterpillars of some attractive moths and butterflies.
 
Many of these plants were originally cultivated as culinary herbs or vegetables and may still be enjoyed today.  Remember in addition, that these species are native to Britain and Ireland and they certainly have a right to share our space with us!    
 
If you would like to read more about "Weeds" we can recommend the rather balanced "The book of weeds: How to deal with plants that behave badly" by Ken Thompson (2009) published by Dorling Kindersley, and for a more literary encomium of a small number of species: "Weeds" by Richard Mabey (2010) Profile books. Also try Hatfield, A.W. 1970. How to enjoy your Weeds. Frederick Muller. London.
 
 
Cick on the image or link to find out more about these plants.
         Chickweed                     Cleavers                         Nettles                 
         Fat hen                  Garlic mustard                  Herb Robert  
        Ragworts                    Couch grass            Creeping buttercup      
   Rosebay willowherb           Dandelion                 Bindweeds           
       Garden Wildplants
             Garden Wildplants