Daisy Bellis perennis    
 
Family Asteraceae, Daisy family
Perennial – up to 5 cm tall, c. 7 cm spread
Flowering – March to November, and occasionally through the winter
Soils -  any type, neutral pH
Sun – Full sun or partial shade
 
 
 
The familiar daisy was first formally recorded by William Turner “The father of English Botany” in 1538.1.  There are about 50 local names for this very familiar flower including banewort, bone flower, bruisewort, days-eye and miss modesty.  Names such as bone flower and bruisewort derive from the supposed healing properties of this plant.  The common name comes from “Day’s eye”, and indeed the flowers open and close with the daylight. It was thought a herald of spring “it ain’t spring until you can put your foot on twelve daisies”.2.
 
The leaves and flowers are edible and can be used in salads. The sweet scent of the flowers is used in perfumery. This is a very popular flower among children for the Daisy-chains which can be made by threading the flower stalks through one another. Daisy chains were traditionally worn by children on Empire Day (24th May) from 1903 to 1958.2.
 
In the wild daisies are native to dry grassland, especially where hard grazed or trodden. They are often considered by sward purists as a weed, but what’s not to love about the homely sight of Daisies twinkling in a lawn? The glossy, drought–proof leaves provide a resilient green carpet even in places where the wear and tear kills other plants. The long flowering period provides a nectar source especially early in the year.
 
 
Daisies are food plants for a number of leaf-miner flies and micro-moths and they are visited by pollinating bees and flies.  Daisies support caterpillars of the common noctuid moths the brown-line bright-eye Mythimna conigera and the large ranunculus Polymixis flavicincta.  The red carpet moth Xanthorhoe decoloraria  is also recorded feeding on daisy.3. 
 
References
 
 
1.  Pearman, D. 2017. The Discovery of the Native Flora of Britain and Ireland, A compilation of the first records for 1670 species and aggregates, covering Great Britain, Ireland, The Channel Isles and the Isle of Man. Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland. p 114
 
2.  Vickery, R. 2019. Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A to Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. London. p 193.
 
3.  See the Biological records Centre database  
                                                                              
 
Page written by Camilla Lambrick, compiled by Steve Head
 
The familiar daisy was first formally recorded by William Turner “The father of English Botany” in 1538.1.  There are about 50 local names for this very familiar flower including banewort, bone flower, bruisewort, days-eye and miss modesty.  Names such as bone flower and bruisewort derive from the supposed healing properties of this plant.  The common name comes from “Day’s eye”, and indeed the flowers open and close with the daylight. It was thought a herald of spring “it ain’t spring until you can put your foot on twelve daisies”.2.
 
The leaves and flowers are edible and can be used in salads. The sweet scent of the flowers is used in perfumery. This is a very popular flower among children for the Daisy-chains which can be made by threading the flower stalks through one another. Daisy chains were traditionally worn by children on Empire Day (24th May) from 1903 to 1958.2.
 
In the wild daisies are native to dry grassland, especially where hard grazed or trodden. They are often considered by sward purists as a weed, but what’s not to love about the homely sight of Daisies twinkling in a lawn? The glossy, drought–proof leaves provide a resilient green carpet even in places where the wear and tear kills other plants. The long flowering period provides a nectar source especially early in the year.
 
 
Daisies are food plants for a number of leaf-miner flies and micro-moths and they are visited by pollinating bees and flies.  Daisies support caterpillars of the common noctuid moths the brown-line bright-eye Mythimna conigera and the large ranunculus Polymixis flavicincta.  The red carpet moth Xanthorhoe decoloraria  is also recorded feeding on daisy.3. 
 
References
 
 
1.  Pearman, D. 2017. The Discovery of the Native Flora of Britain and Ireland, A compilation of the first records for 1670 species and aggregates, covering Great Britain, Ireland, The Channel Isles and the Isle of Man. Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland. p 114
 
2.  Vickery, R. 2019. Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A to Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. London. p 193.
 
3.  See the Biological records Centre database  
                                                                              
 
Page written by Camilla Lambrick, compiled by Steve Head
Daisy Bellis perennis    
 
Family Asteraceae, Daisy family
Perennial – up to 5 cm tall, c. 7 cm spread
Flowering – March to November, and occasionally through the winter
Soils -  any type, neutral pH
Sun – Full sun or partial shade
 
 
       Garden Wildplants
             Garden Wildplants