“Roman” Chamomile Chamaemelum nobile was first formally recorded from Richmond Green and Hounslow by William Turner in his 1548 book “The Names of Herbes”.1.  “German” chamomile Matricaria chamomilla or scented mayweed, is a related annual species with an erect habit.  Another relative is pineapple weed Matricaria discoidea, an originally Asian escapee from Kew Gardens in 1894 which has spread exceptionally fast through all of Britain and Ireland on waste or disturbed ground.2. It smells strongly of pineapple.
 
 
Chamomile  Chamaemelum nobile
 
FamilyAsteraceae, Daisy family
Perennial – up to 10 cm tall, to 30cm spread
Flowering – June to September
Soils -  Neutral
Sun – Full sun or partial shade
 
 
 
         Scented mayweed Matricaria chamomilla                         Pineapple weed Matricaria discoidea
 
Dried flowers are used  in chamomile tea and as a fragrance and considered a cure for toothache and headache. It is also commonly considered an aid to sleep.3.
 
Chamomile is a low-growing daisy-like plant with a strong sweet and fruity scent. It has quite long sprawling stems and feathery leaves. It grows as a spreading mat, and exudes a strong scent when walked upon. It has been used on a small scale on light soils as "chamomile lawns".  These do not tolerate heavy pedestrian use but have the great advantage of not needing mowing.4.
 
Chamomile does not support many insects.  It is food for weevils Ceutorhynchus rugulosus and Gymnetron rostellum, and for the moths chamomile shark Cucullia chamomillae  and bordered pug Eupithecia succenturiate.5.
 
 
References
 
 
1.  Pearman, D. 2017. The Discovery of the Native Flora of Britain and Ireland, A compilation of the first records for 1670 species and aggregates, covering Great Britain, Ireland, The Channel Isles and the Isle of Man. Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland. P153
 
2.  Online atlas of the British and Irish Flora
 
3.  Vickery, R. 2019. Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A to Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. London. p.132
 
4.  RHS plant profile for chamomile.
 
5.  See the Biological Records Centre database  
 
 
Page written by Camilla Lambrick, compiled by Steve Head
Chamomile  Chamaemelum nobile
 
 
 
FamilyAsteraceae, Daisy family
Perennial – up to 10 cm tall, to 30cm spread
Flowering – June to September
Soils -  Neutral
Sun – Full sun or partial shade
 
 
“Roman” Chamomile Chamaemelum nobile was first formally recorded from Richmond Green and Hounslow by William Turner in his 1548 book “The Names of Herbes”.1.  “German” chamomile Matricaria chamomilla or scented mayweed, is a related annual species with an erect habit.  Another relative is pineapple weed Matricaria discoidea, an originally Asian escapee from Kew Gardens in 1894 which has spread exceptionally fast through all of Britain and Ireland on waste or disturbed ground.2. It smells strongly of pineapple.
 
 
 
  Scented mayweed Matricaria chamomilla      Pineapple weed Matricaria discoidea
 
Dried flowers are used  in chamomile tea and as a fragrance and considered a cure for toothache and headache. It is also commonly considered an aid to sleep.3.
 
Chamomile is a low-growing daisy-like plant with a strong sweet and fruity scent. It has quite long sprawling stems and feathery leaves. It grows as a spreading mat, and exudes a strong scent when walked upon. It has been used on a small scale on light soils as "chamomile lawns".  These do not tolerate heavy pedestrian use but have the great advantage of not needing mowing.4.
 
Chamomile does not support many insects.  It is food for weevils Ceutorhynchus rugulosus and Gymnetron rostellum, and for the moths chamomile shark Cucullia chamomillae  and bordered pug Eupithecia succenturiate.5.
 
 
References
 
1.  Pearman, D. 2017. The Discovery of the Native Flora of Britain and Ireland, A compilation of the first records for 1670 species and aggregates, covering Great Britain, Ireland, The Channel Isles and the Isle of Man. Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland. P153
 
2.  Online atlas of the British and Irish Flora
 
3.  Vickery, R. 2019. Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A to Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. London. p.132
 
4.  RHS plant profile for chamomile.
 
5.  See the Biological Records Centre database  
 
 
Page written by Camilla Lambrick, compiled by Steve Head
       Garden Wildplants
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